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Posts Tagged ‘vegetarian’

The past three years, I’ve had the honor of making Thanksgiving dinner. Not surprisingly, I always strive to make a healthy meal that still reflects the style and aesthetic of traditional Thanksgiving cuisine. My meals are always vegetarian, but this meal was vegan (with the exception of one dessert that uses organic eggs), partially raw, and almost entirely grainless. My food always uses no refined or unnatural sweeteners or artificial ingredients. Everything is from scratch (with the exception of one dessert where I use a pre-made pie crust). I didn’t follow a recipe for everything, but I’ll give you a basic idea of how to re-create these dishes.

Dinner

Raw Vegan Stuffing

Process raw sunflower seeds and almonds (or any other raw nuts or seeds) in the food processor. Add chopped onion, grated carrot, chopped celery, chopped apple, chopped button mushrooms, and fresh sage, thyme, and basil. Add olive oil and sea salt to taste, combine well, and dehydrate in a food dehydrator (I use Excalibur) at 110 degrees for about six hours, stirring every few hours. Dehydrating isn’t completely necessary, but it gave this stuffing a very authentic texture.

Sautéed Collard Greens

Add chopped onion to a pan with olive oil. Once onions are slightly browned, add finely chopped collard greens and some water to the pan and cover it. Adding water allows the collard greens to steam. Since collard greens are so dense, they need more time to cook than most greens.

Roasted Vegetables

Pre-heat oven to 350F degrees. Cut and peel butternut squash, turnip, red pepper, onion, asparagus, and brussell sprouts to uniform-sized pieces. Coat in olive oil, sea salt, and fresh or dried herbs of choice (rosemary, thyme, etc). Put most dense vegetables (squash, brussell sprouts) in the oven first, followed by onion, peppers, asparagus. Stir vegetables after about 10 minutes to insure browning; continue to cook to desired darkness.

Raw Mashed “Potatoes” (Parsnips)

Combine parsnips, pine nuts (or other nut), water, lemon juice, 1-2 cloves of garlic, sea salt, and a drizzle of olive oil in a high-powered blender (I use Vita-Mix) or food process. Process until smooth. Warm in the dehydrator if desired.

Raw Mushroom Gravy

Great on mashed parsnips, raw stuffing, or anything else. Combine shiitake mushrooms, raw almonds, garlic, water, olive oil, and fresh sage in a high-powered blender or food processor.

Raw Cauliflower “Rice”

This dish has a texture similar to couscous. Break apart a large head of cauliflower and place in large, heat-safe bowl. Pour boiling water to cover and let sit for about one minute. Drain, then add cauliflower, garlic, basil, sea salt, olive oil, and turmeric to a food processor and process until a rice-like consistency is reached.

Mashed Sweet Potatoes with Coconut Milk

Steam or boil sweet potatoes (I prefer garnet yams) until tender. Mash, add about a half can of coconut milk, and continue mashing over low heat. Season with cinnamon and sea salt.

Cranberry Sauce

I adapted this recipe from Clean Eating Magazine. Add 12 oz fresh cranberries, 1 chopped apple, 1/2 cup raw agave nectar (or raw honey), 1/2 cup water, 1 1/2 TBS minced fresh ginger, juice of 1/2 large lemon, and 1/8 tsp sea salt to a saucepan. Bring to a boil, then let simmer for 8 to 10 minutes. Stir often and allow to cool completely before serving. I found it wasn’t quite sweet enough for my liking, so I added a bit more agave and a few drops of liquid stevia.

Dessert

Raw Cacao (Chocolate) Mud Pie

This recipe is a bit elaborate, but this pie is exquisite. It tastes like flourless chocolate cake but is made from incredibly healthful ingredients.
For the crust:
– 2 cups raw nuts (walnuts and pecans)
– 1 cup dates
– 2 cups unsweetened shredded coconut
– 1/2 cup raw cacao powder
– 4 TBS agave nectar
Process dates and nuts in food processor; add other crust ingredients until well-blended. Press into a springform pan and chill in the refrigerator.
For the filling:
– 1 cup coconut oil
– 2 small/medium avocados
– 1 cup cacao powder
– 1/2 cup agave nectar
– a few drops liquid stevia
– 1 tsp vanilla extract
Blend all filling ingredients without overmixing. Add to crust, top with shredded coconut, and allow to chill in fridge for a few hours before serving.

Raw Apple Crisp

Chop gala apples and coat in a mixture of lemon juice, coconut oil, agave, maple flavoring, cinnamon, and almond milk or water. Let soften in dehydrator at 110 degrees for a few hours, or serve apples raw. The crisp topping is adapted from Ani’s Raw Food Kitchen by Ani Phyo. In a food processor, lightly process 3/4 cup pecans, 1/8 tsp salt, and 1/2 tsp cinnamon. Add 1/2 cup chopped dates, 1 tsp vanilla extract, and 2 TBS coconut oil and process. Add topping to apples.

Flourless Gingerbread

Ingredients:
– 1 cup almond butter (roasted is fine)
– 4 organic eggs
– pinch salt
– 1 tsp baking soda
– 1 tsp vanilla extract
– 1 TBS maple flavor
– 2 TBS powdered ginger, 1 TBS cinnamon
– 1 TBS agave
– 1/4 tsp strong stevia powder
Combine all ingredients well. Line a loaf pan with parchment paper (very important!) and bake at 325F degrees for about 20 minutes.

Pumpkin Pie

Ingredients:
– 1 pre-made spelt pie crust
– 1 cup canned pumpkin
– 1 large carrot
– 3/4 cup almond milk
– 2 TBS tapioca starch (or other thickener)
– 3 TBS coconut oil
– 1/4 tsp strong stevia powder or natural sweetener of choice
– pumpkin pie spice to taste, dash sea salt
Blend all filling ingredients in blender, pour into crust, bake at 375F degrees for about 30 minutes. Let cool completely before serving (even stick it in the fridge).

Desserts were served with cashew cream, combining 1 cup cashews, 1/2 cup almond milk, and a few drops liquid stevia in the blender.

And there you have my Thanksgiving dinner! I’m still enjoying the leftovers. I hope you all had a wonderful, happy holiday.

Eat well,
Emily

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2009_01_16-fakemeat

A vegetarian diet is often thought of as a healthy lifestyle choice. Many people say they are vegetarian for “health reasons,” implying that it is healthier than a meat-eating diet. While a diet that emphasizes vegetables and plant-based foods is often superior, there are many dangerous pitfalls to which many vegetarians succumb.

The Problem with Meat
In America, conventionally-raised meat is a dangerous, unhealthy, and unsanitary product. Animals are kept in disgusting and confining conditions, are often unable to move, and live on carcasses of dead animals. They are force-fed an unnatural diet to grow at enormous rates and often given steroids and hormones to excel their growth further. Many times they’re given antibioitics and other drugs in an attempt to keep them from catching infectious disease from their unhygienic conditions. These animals are sickly, often diseased, and live a tortured life from birth. There is simply no way this can yield healthy meat, eggs, or dairy. Factory farms and slaughterhouses would rather perform their operations as cheap as possible and pay for the occasional recall (due to deaths from E. Coli or a similar outbreak) than pay for the cost of cleaner, well-maintained facilities. It’s a sad a reality.

Conventional meat production takes a huge toll on our planet as well. More than a third of all raw materials and fossil fuels consumed in America are used in animal production. Beef production alone uses more water than growing the nation’s entire fruit and vegetable crop. Animals raised for meat also generate about 2.7 trillion pounds of waste annually (more than the human population) which leads to contamination and disease outbreaks. The effect of meat consumption on America’s health, the environment, and the animals is complex and compelling. I urge you to read more if you’re interested by seeing films like Food Inc. and visiting GoVeg.com. If you’re not convinced, I urge you to watch footage inside real factory farms.

Better Options
If you still choose to eat meat, there are some better options. Certified Organic meat is not treated with antibiotics or hormones, and often has more sanitary farming conditions. “Free-range” is an unregulated term, meaning animals may only get a few minutes outside of their confinement per week. There are no health standards for free-range meat or eggs. Grass-fed is the best choice for any meat. This means the animal was a fed a diet of grass as opposed to corn, soybeans, or animal waste, all of which are unnatural and make the animal sick. Because of the high cost and difficult to find organic and grass-fed meat, many people find it easier to eliminate these foods altogether and take on a vegetarian diet.

The Biggest Vegetarian Pitfall: Becoming a Carbotarian
“Where do you get your protein?” is something I’ve heard a thousand times as a vegetarian. First of all, we do not need nearly as much protein as conventional dietary advice suggests. That being said, there are plenty of adequate vegetarian protein sources (that aren’t meat substitutes; more on that in a bit). Also, nutrients like iron and B12 that are often found in meat can be found either in nutrient-dense plant foods or in a simple multivitamin. I have found it is much more likely that a meat eater is lacking in plant-based nutrients than a vegetarian lacking in meat-based nutrients. Why does no one ask a meat eater, “Where do you get your Vitamin C? Antioxidants? Vitamin A? Vitamin K? B Vitamins? Magnesium? Potassium?” I think those questions are far more valid.

Taking on a vegetarian diet proposes a larger problem that often goes overlooked: excessive carbohydrate intake. Grain products (even whole grains) do not offer much nutritionally. Carbs, especially simple and refined carbs like white bread, white pasta, and white rice, convert into the body as sugar. They spike insulin levels, cause inflammation, make us gain weight, and often leave to chronic digestive issues. You can consume more than enough carbohydrates simply from eating fruits and vegetables. However, in eliminating animal products, many people feel that grains are the only thing they can eat. It can be a challenge, but it is absolutely imperative to focus your diet on vegetables, nuts and seeds, some fruit, and organic eggs (if you choose to include animal products). Grains are addictive. Ever feel yourself coming on with an extreme bread craving? There’s a reason. Your body becomes attached and addicted to these foods that ultimately leave you wanting more. Not until you fully ween yourself off these grain products will you see your overall health improve and your cravings disappear.

Vegetarian Junk Food
Vegetarians often turn to meat substitutes. Companies like Morningstar Farms and Boca have done very well with the increase in vegetarianism. However, these foods are simply not healthy. They are heavily processed (and you know how I feel about processed foods) and almost always made from soy. Soy has health benefits, however, they are truly present in a pure form like edamame, organic unsweetened soymilk, or tempeh (a fermented version of tofu). Heavily-manufactured soy products are not nutritious, despite the wealth of health claims on the package. Soy is difficult to digest for many, and should never be the focus of any diet. Vegetarians can fall into a trap of eating cereal with soy milk for breakfast, soy mock deli meat at lunch, a soy-based burger for dinner, and soy ice cream for dessert. This is simply too much soy, all of it heavily processed.

I am a big fan of the Raw Vegan diet because it is very heavy in the consumption of vegetables, nuts and seeds, and fruit. Everything you eat must be raw (not heated about 115 degrees), so no grains are included. Raw vegans make meat substitutes out of grinding raw nuts and seeds and adding herbs and spices. I am not 100% raw vegan because I still consume organic eggs, but I follow many of the raw vegan principles on a daily basis.

The wisest way to be vegetarian is to follow the advice for any healthy diet: stick to whole foods, or something that you can recognize as a product of nature. Base your diet around vegetables, not grains and breads. In fact, the more you can limit them, the better. Your health will improve, and you will fill the void with more vegetables, healthy fats, and organic protein sources.

This is merely the tip of the iceberg on how to live a healthy, vegetarian lifestyle. If you have more specific concerns, I’m happy to take your questions and do some follow-up posts if needed.

Eat your vegetables,
Emily

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