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This post is not health-related, but it is certainly relevant. Many people who are passionate about food like to share photos of their meals. The better your picture, the more likely people are to get excited about your meal and engage in discussion. As a food blogger and photographer, I’ve been taking pictures of my food for years.

I use a Canon digital SLR. I recently upgraded to the Rebel T3i from my Rebel XS. Regardless of the camera, a digital SLR has a lot of advantages. Here are some things I recommend when choosing equipment.

1. Digital SLR. SLR cameras (Single Lens Reflex) have large lenses that can be removed from the body of the camera. If your budget allows and you aren’t inconvenienced by the larger size, these cameras take superior photos. Removable lenses allow you to switch to different lenses for different shooting needs (macro lens for close-up photos, for example). These cameras also have the most customizable settings to optimize light, movement, and focus.
2. High Image Resolution. If you’re not ready to commit to SLR, there are many point-and-shoot cameras that take high-quality pictures. Look for high image resolutions and shoot at the highest quality your camera allows.

Unfortunately, the camera doesn’t do all the work for you. Here are some photography tips to keep in mind when shooting to optimize your photos.

1. Light. Photography is all about light. You want to avoid using the built-in flash on your camera, so make sure your food is in a well-lit place. Avoid direct sunlight because of the dramatic shadows it creates, unless that’s the look you’re going for.
2. Presentation. Make sure your food is prepared in a way that looks appealing, even if it’s not the way you’d ultimately eat it. You are composing a tiny work of art, so keep in mind colors, shapes, lines, and composition. Also make sure you don’t have anything distracting or unattractive in the background. A blank slate is best—try to find a place where you can have a plain backdrop.
3. Hold steady. If you’re shooting on an automatic setting, your camera will adjust the shutter speed based on how much light there is. If light isn’t plentiful, it will likely leave the shutter open a bit longer, which means your photos can come out blurry. To avoid this, hold very still while you take the picture, or consider using a tripod. Ideally, you will have enough light that your shutter speed will be fast.
3. Edit. Even the greatest photographers edit their photos. Ideally, professional software like Adobe Photoshop is best, but Aperture, iPhoto, and many other photo-editing programs work well. Adjust saturation, contrast, and re-crop for the ideal shot. Many programs offer a way to lighten areas of shadow, which can be very handy for showing all the detail in your food.

Hopefully this inspires photography newbies to snap some shots of their food. Do you have any tips you’d like to add?

Emily Davidson, creator of Healthy Eating, Naturally and Historically Incorrect, is a blogger and copywriter at Lela.com. Lela is a fun, interactive online shopping tool that helps parents find the perfect electronics and baby products using unique and intuitive technology and personalized Product Ratings.

If you’re reading this post, you’re probably already aware of just how toxic sugar is in the human body. But if you’re not yet convinced, let’s review some convincing reasons to eliminate sugar from our diets.


Disease. We know that sugar causes Type 2 Diabetes and drastically affects blood glucose levels. Sugar also causes inflammation in the body, which plays a main role in nearly all chronic conditions. It depletes the immune system and makes you the victim of every cold and flu going around. And because your immune system is down, your allergies are likely to be worse. (I’m not talking about a fatal allergy to peanuts, but more like seasonal allergies.)

Daily Life. The alarm goes off. You’re tired. You have coffee, maybe breakfast if you’re lucky. An hour or so goes by, and you’re tired. You eat lunch. You’re tired, and still hungry. Tiredness and hunger are almost always a result of drops in blood sugar. Provided we got adequate sleep the night before, we should not be tired all day long. This only happens when our bodies are not running on appropriate fuel. Sugar, and foods that act like sugar in the body, constantly send our blood sugar plummeting leaving us starving and exhausted. Imagine a weekday where you’re alert, satiated, and a nap doesn’t even sound that appealing. It is possible! And what about stomach upsets? Bloating and gas are just a few of the stomach symptoms that are affected by sugar. Our digestive system is filled with bacteria, both “good” and “bad” organisms, that keep things running properly. When the “bad” bacteria takes control, it causes digestive distress. It should come as no surprise at this point that bad bacteria feed on sugar. Sugar and refined carbohydrates are a sure way to sustain these harmful organisms and make your digestive system weak and vulnerable.

The Addiction. Sugar is addictive. It sends our brains and bodies the same signals as heroin, cocaine, and nicotine. The more we have, the more our body craves it, and the more we feel that we can’t get by without it. Luckily, addictions can be broken. It’s not easy, but a sugar addiction can be beat much quicker than one to nicotine, and the rewards are endless.

A few more thoughts before we start. Don’t cry over over the fact that you’ll never be able to have your mom’s Christmas cookies again. Don’t mourn the loss of your favorite blueberry muffin from that cute bakery. Once you break the addiction, you can treat yourself now and then. That means once a week or every other week, you can have one poisonous item that you love. You’ll probably feel terrible afterwards, and it will be a sweet reminder of how nice it is to live without sugar.

Define “sugar.” Sugar is a carbohydrate, arguably the worst kind. All carbohydrates behave similarly in the body; they’re burned quickly and cause a blood sugar drop. How fast and severe the drop is depends on the kind of carbohydrate. Pure sugar is the worst offender. Refined carbs, like white bread (or any bread with white flour), pasta, and white rice, are the next worst. I would also put fruit in this category. While fruit is healthy, it is still sugar, and it is counterproductive to be consuming any of the addictive substance when you’re trying to break the addiction. Lastly, complex carbohydrates like whole grains and sweet potatoes spike your blood sugar the least. However, these are still carbohydrates and still spike your blood sugar. They should be kept in moderation. I am an advocate for a low carb diet overall for this reason, but I understand that everyone is coming from a different place on the journey to health. If sugar and refined carbs (which behave like sugar in the body) are all you can manage to eliminate, start there.

Week One: Withdrawal.
Your first week will be difficult. If you’re lucky (and not too addicted), the difficulty will end after that. You will experience withdrawal in the form of intense cravings. Don’t worry. It’s normal, and when it passes, the energy and vitality you will feel is priceless. The most important thing is to stick to your guns. Remind yourself that it is only one week until the cravings stop and you can survive one week.

Things to Avoid:
Anything that is obviously sugary. Candy, desserts, soda, pastries. These ones should be no-brainers. Also alcohol, which is pure sugar in the body. This means all beer, wine, and liquor.
Highly Refined carbs. These foods behave like sugar in the body. Pasta, bread that contains any white flour, white rice, bagels, pretzels, crackers, most cereals, etc. It’s easier to just avoid processed foods, but if you’re eating something with an ingredient list, avoid any kind of “wheat flour.” If it doesn’t have the word “whole” in front of it, it’s refined white flour.
“Health” food. Most things we consider “healthy” are laden with sugar. Fruit, while healthy in theory, is best avoided for the first week. You can have 1 serving a day of berries (which are low in sugar) if you’d like. Fruit juices and juice drinks are full of sugar; the fact that the sugar is natural is irrelevant. Granola bars and dried fruit are full of sugar. If you’re eating something with a label, aim for less than 5 grams of sugar. Natural sweeteners are out for now, too—that means honey, agave, brown rice syrup, maple syrup, etc.

It seems like nothing is left, right? Here are some ideas to get you thinking about what to eat without sugar in the picture. Focus on protein and fat to keep you from feeling ravenous and deprived.

Breakfast:
Skip cereal, toast, bagels, and pastries, and avoid sweetened yogurt (which is nearly all yogurt). Instead try: eggs, plain unsweetened greek yogurt with stevia (more on stevia in a bit), a piece of sprouted grain toast (I recommend Ezekiel bread, available in the refrigerated section at health food stores and many grocery stores) with almond butter or peanut butter. Or skip “breakfast” foods altogether and eat lunch foods for breakfast.

Lunch:
Avoid sandwiches on white bread. Look for 100% whole wheat, or even better, try sprouted Ezekiel bread. Salads (avoid sugary dressings), nuts, meat, avocado, fresh veggies, high-quality cheese.

Dinner:
Swap out white pasta for 100% whole wheat pasta or an alternative pasta like soba noodles (made from buckwheat) or brown rice pasta. Instead of white rice have brown rice or try a grain like quinoa. Be sure to include fat and protein (and plenty of veggies while you’re at it).

If you are desperate for sweetness, try stevia, a natural sweetener containing no sugar. It also has no effect on blood sugar and no known side effects. Steer clear of aspartame and sucralose (Splenda) which are poisonous and only increase cravings. Stevia is available at health food stores as a powder or a liquid. It works great in coffee, tea, yogurt, and pretty much anything else.

Need Relief? There are some things that can help you when you’re really desperate for something sweet.
– A cup of herbal, black, or green tea sweetened with stevia
– Dark chocolate, over 80%, a small piece
– Nut butters like almond butter, cashew butter, and sunbutter (made from sunflower seeds)
– A small serving of berries with cinnamon
– Plain, unsweetened greek yogurt with stevia, cinnamon, and berries

Be realistic. I am passionate about healthy eating and nutrition, so it’s hard for me to advocate certain foods. My recommendations may seem drastic depending on what your lifestyle is like. If you don’t consider yourself to be much of a health nut, remember that your main concern is cutting out sugar. If you make eliminating sugar/refined carbs your priority, you will be successful in beating the addiction. I wouldn’t encourage a diet of deli ham and string cheese, but it will theoretically be cutting out the sugar. You decide what you think you can handle.

Give it a week, then assess. I think most addictions can be beat in about a week’s time. You’ll know when you’ve done it because the cravings and lethargy will stop. If you suddenly feel great after about a week’s time, you can choose to slowly reintroduce some carbs depending on how much you’ve cut back. However, you might find that you feel so great with your new diet that you don’t want to add them back… and that’s the goal! If you are still having cravings and feeling awful after a week, unfortunately that means you’ll have to keep at it a bit longer. But it will end, I promise.

Disclaimer: As I mentioned, I am in favor of a low carb diet overall. I don’t like to condone the consumption of wheat (as well as many other grains) as it is highly inflammatory and irritating to most people’s digestive system. However, I suggest the whole wheat products in this post to encourage those who are not ready to give up bread to at least avoid white flour. This post is about giving up sugar and I wanted to keep the focus on that. If you are successful, there are many ways to go deeper and reach superior health, and I’m always here to answer your questions.

Sweetly,
Emily

I was recently interviewed at FriendsEat.com. It’s a pretty in-depth interview where I talk in detail about my experiences on my journey to health through diet. Check it out!

Read the article here.

Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays!

I hope you’re having a joyous holiday. The holiday season is a time of enjoyment and celebration, but many of us worry about derailing our health in the process. It is definitely possible to treat yourself and still keep your health in tact. Here are a few pieces of advice I try to follow during this exciting time.

Quick Tips for Staying Healthy in the Holiday Season
1. Choose your indulgences. Not every treat is bound to be your favorite, so select a few that you can’t live without and kindly pass on the others. This will keep your intake of excess sugar and unhealthy ingredients to a minimum.
2. Drink water. Heavy foods and alcohol will dehydrate you, so make sure to be drinking plain water all day. Even mild dehydration can lead to headaches, low energy, and hunger (when you’re not truly hungry).
3. Eat your greens. Green vegetables, especially leafy ones like spinach, kale, or swiss chard, have a powerful cleansing effect on the body. Counteract the extra sugar and processed foods with a generous helping of greens or a large green salad as often as possible.
4. Make time to be active. While it may seem impossible to schedule a trip to the gym during holiday festivities, make time to go for a walk or get your heartrate up with jumping jacks or other simple exercises you can do at home. Just 15 or 20 minutes of activity can help off-set some of the extra calories you’ve consumed and banish the sluggish feeling you get from overeating.
5. Watch your immunity. We’re all susceptible to colds and flu this time of year, and the extra sugar and unhealthy treats make us more vulnerable. Be sure to include a generous serving of vegetables with every meal and consume immunity boosting foods like garlic, onions, and fresh lemon juice in water.
6. Supplement. While I think most of our nutrients should come from food, it’s a bit difficult when you’re consuming holiday cuisine. Be sure to take a good-quality multivitamin daily, and consider vitamin C (500mg to 1000mg), probiotics (for digestive health), and immune supplements (containing garlic, medicinal mushrooms, or herbs like echinacea or astragulus).

Have a healthy and happy holiday,
Emily

The past three years, I’ve had the honor of making Thanksgiving dinner. Not surprisingly, I always strive to make a healthy meal that still reflects the style and aesthetic of traditional Thanksgiving cuisine. My meals are always vegetarian, but this meal was vegan (with the exception of one dessert that uses organic eggs), partially raw, and almost entirely grainless. My food always uses no refined or unnatural sweeteners or artificial ingredients. Everything is from scratch (with the exception of one dessert where I use a pre-made pie crust). I didn’t follow a recipe for everything, but I’ll give you a basic idea of how to re-create these dishes.

Dinner

Raw Vegan Stuffing

Process raw sunflower seeds and almonds (or any other raw nuts or seeds) in the food processor. Add chopped onion, grated carrot, chopped celery, chopped apple, chopped button mushrooms, and fresh sage, thyme, and basil. Add olive oil and sea salt to taste, combine well, and dehydrate in a food dehydrator (I use Excalibur) at 110 degrees for about six hours, stirring every few hours. Dehydrating isn’t completely necessary, but it gave this stuffing a very authentic texture.

Sautéed Collard Greens

Add chopped onion to a pan with olive oil. Once onions are slightly browned, add finely chopped collard greens and some water to the pan and cover it. Adding water allows the collard greens to steam. Since collard greens are so dense, they need more time to cook than most greens.

Roasted Vegetables

Pre-heat oven to 350F degrees. Cut and peel butternut squash, turnip, red pepper, onion, asparagus, and brussell sprouts to uniform-sized pieces. Coat in olive oil, sea salt, and fresh or dried herbs of choice (rosemary, thyme, etc). Put most dense vegetables (squash, brussell sprouts) in the oven first, followed by onion, peppers, asparagus. Stir vegetables after about 10 minutes to insure browning; continue to cook to desired darkness.

Raw Mashed “Potatoes” (Parsnips)

Combine parsnips, pine nuts (or other nut), water, lemon juice, 1-2 cloves of garlic, sea salt, and a drizzle of olive oil in a high-powered blender (I use Vita-Mix) or food process. Process until smooth. Warm in the dehydrator if desired.

Raw Mushroom Gravy

Great on mashed parsnips, raw stuffing, or anything else. Combine shiitake mushrooms, raw almonds, garlic, water, olive oil, and fresh sage in a high-powered blender or food processor.

Raw Cauliflower “Rice”

This dish has a texture similar to couscous. Break apart a large head of cauliflower and place in large, heat-safe bowl. Pour boiling water to cover and let sit for about one minute. Drain, then add cauliflower, garlic, basil, sea salt, olive oil, and turmeric to a food processor and process until a rice-like consistency is reached.

Mashed Sweet Potatoes with Coconut Milk

Steam or boil sweet potatoes (I prefer garnet yams) until tender. Mash, add about a half can of coconut milk, and continue mashing over low heat. Season with cinnamon and sea salt.

Cranberry Sauce

I adapted this recipe from Clean Eating Magazine. Add 12 oz fresh cranberries, 1 chopped apple, 1/2 cup raw agave nectar (or raw honey), 1/2 cup water, 1 1/2 TBS minced fresh ginger, juice of 1/2 large lemon, and 1/8 tsp sea salt to a saucepan. Bring to a boil, then let simmer for 8 to 10 minutes. Stir often and allow to cool completely before serving. I found it wasn’t quite sweet enough for my liking, so I added a bit more agave and a few drops of liquid stevia.

Dessert

Raw Cacao (Chocolate) Mud Pie

This recipe is a bit elaborate, but this pie is exquisite. It tastes like flourless chocolate cake but is made from incredibly healthful ingredients.
For the crust:
– 2 cups raw nuts (walnuts and pecans)
– 1 cup dates
– 2 cups unsweetened shredded coconut
– 1/2 cup raw cacao powder
– 4 TBS agave nectar
Process dates and nuts in food processor; add other crust ingredients until well-blended. Press into a springform pan and chill in the refrigerator.
For the filling:
– 1 cup coconut oil
– 2 small/medium avocados
– 1 cup cacao powder
– 1/2 cup agave nectar
– a few drops liquid stevia
– 1 tsp vanilla extract
Blend all filling ingredients without overmixing. Add to crust, top with shredded coconut, and allow to chill in fridge for a few hours before serving.

Raw Apple Crisp

Chop gala apples and coat in a mixture of lemon juice, coconut oil, agave, maple flavoring, cinnamon, and almond milk or water. Let soften in dehydrator at 110 degrees for a few hours, or serve apples raw. The crisp topping is adapted from Ani’s Raw Food Kitchen by Ani Phyo. In a food processor, lightly process 3/4 cup pecans, 1/8 tsp salt, and 1/2 tsp cinnamon. Add 1/2 cup chopped dates, 1 tsp vanilla extract, and 2 TBS coconut oil and process. Add topping to apples.

Flourless Gingerbread

Ingredients:
– 1 cup almond butter (roasted is fine)
– 4 organic eggs
– pinch salt
– 1 tsp baking soda
– 1 tsp vanilla extract
– 1 TBS maple flavor
– 2 TBS powdered ginger, 1 TBS cinnamon
– 1 TBS agave
– 1/4 tsp strong stevia powder
Combine all ingredients well. Line a loaf pan with parchment paper (very important!) and bake at 325F degrees for about 20 minutes.

Pumpkin Pie

Ingredients:
– 1 pre-made spelt pie crust
– 1 cup canned pumpkin
– 1 large carrot
– 3/4 cup almond milk
– 2 TBS tapioca starch (or other thickener)
– 3 TBS coconut oil
– 1/4 tsp strong stevia powder or natural sweetener of choice
– pumpkin pie spice to taste, dash sea salt
Blend all filling ingredients in blender, pour into crust, bake at 375F degrees for about 30 minutes. Let cool completely before serving (even stick it in the fridge).

Desserts were served with cashew cream, combining 1 cup cashews, 1/2 cup almond milk, and a few drops liquid stevia in the blender.

And there you have my Thanksgiving dinner! I’m still enjoying the leftovers. I hope you all had a wonderful, happy holiday.

Eat well,
Emily

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A vegetarian diet is often thought of as a healthy lifestyle choice. Many people say they are vegetarian for “health reasons,” implying that it is healthier than a meat-eating diet. While a diet that emphasizes vegetables and plant-based foods is often superior, there are many dangerous pitfalls to which many vegetarians succumb.

The Problem with Meat
In America, conventionally-raised meat is a dangerous, unhealthy, and unsanitary product. Animals are kept in disgusting and confining conditions, are often unable to move, and live on carcasses of dead animals. They are force-fed an unnatural diet to grow at enormous rates and often given steroids and hormones to excel their growth further. Many times they’re given antibioitics and other drugs in an attempt to keep them from catching infectious disease from their unhygienic conditions. These animals are sickly, often diseased, and live a tortured life from birth. There is simply no way this can yield healthy meat, eggs, or dairy. Factory farms and slaughterhouses would rather perform their operations as cheap as possible and pay for the occasional recall (due to deaths from E. Coli or a similar outbreak) than pay for the cost of cleaner, well-maintained facilities. It’s a sad a reality.

Conventional meat production takes a huge toll on our planet as well. More than a third of all raw materials and fossil fuels consumed in America are used in animal production. Beef production alone uses more water than growing the nation’s entire fruit and vegetable crop. Animals raised for meat also generate about 2.7 trillion pounds of waste annually (more than the human population) which leads to contamination and disease outbreaks. The effect of meat consumption on America’s health, the environment, and the animals is complex and compelling. I urge you to read more if you’re interested by seeing films like Food Inc. and visiting GoVeg.com. If you’re not convinced, I urge you to watch footage inside real factory farms.

Better Options
If you still choose to eat meat, there are some better options. Certified Organic meat is not treated with antibiotics or hormones, and often has more sanitary farming conditions. “Free-range” is an unregulated term, meaning animals may only get a few minutes outside of their confinement per week. There are no health standards for free-range meat or eggs. Grass-fed is the best choice for any meat. This means the animal was a fed a diet of grass as opposed to corn, soybeans, or animal waste, all of which are unnatural and make the animal sick. Because of the high cost and difficult to find organic and grass-fed meat, many people find it easier to eliminate these foods altogether and take on a vegetarian diet.

The Biggest Vegetarian Pitfall: Becoming a Carbotarian
“Where do you get your protein?” is something I’ve heard a thousand times as a vegetarian. First of all, we do not need nearly as much protein as conventional dietary advice suggests. That being said, there are plenty of adequate vegetarian protein sources (that aren’t meat substitutes; more on that in a bit). Also, nutrients like iron and B12 that are often found in meat can be found either in nutrient-dense plant foods or in a simple multivitamin. I have found it is much more likely that a meat eater is lacking in plant-based nutrients than a vegetarian lacking in meat-based nutrients. Why does no one ask a meat eater, “Where do you get your Vitamin C? Antioxidants? Vitamin A? Vitamin K? B Vitamins? Magnesium? Potassium?” I think those questions are far more valid.

Taking on a vegetarian diet proposes a larger problem that often goes overlooked: excessive carbohydrate intake. Grain products (even whole grains) do not offer much nutritionally. Carbs, especially simple and refined carbs like white bread, white pasta, and white rice, convert into the body as sugar. They spike insulin levels, cause inflammation, make us gain weight, and often leave to chronic digestive issues. You can consume more than enough carbohydrates simply from eating fruits and vegetables. However, in eliminating animal products, many people feel that grains are the only thing they can eat. It can be a challenge, but it is absolutely imperative to focus your diet on vegetables, nuts and seeds, some fruit, and organic eggs (if you choose to include animal products). Grains are addictive. Ever feel yourself coming on with an extreme bread craving? There’s a reason. Your body becomes attached and addicted to these foods that ultimately leave you wanting more. Not until you fully ween yourself off these grain products will you see your overall health improve and your cravings disappear.

Vegetarian Junk Food
Vegetarians often turn to meat substitutes. Companies like Morningstar Farms and Boca have done very well with the increase in vegetarianism. However, these foods are simply not healthy. They are heavily processed (and you know how I feel about processed foods) and almost always made from soy. Soy has health benefits, however, they are truly present in a pure form like edamame, organic unsweetened soymilk, or tempeh (a fermented version of tofu). Heavily-manufactured soy products are not nutritious, despite the wealth of health claims on the package. Soy is difficult to digest for many, and should never be the focus of any diet. Vegetarians can fall into a trap of eating cereal with soy milk for breakfast, soy mock deli meat at lunch, a soy-based burger for dinner, and soy ice cream for dessert. This is simply too much soy, all of it heavily processed.

I am a big fan of the Raw Vegan diet because it is very heavy in the consumption of vegetables, nuts and seeds, and fruit. Everything you eat must be raw (not heated about 115 degrees), so no grains are included. Raw vegans make meat substitutes out of grinding raw nuts and seeds and adding herbs and spices. I am not 100% raw vegan because I still consume organic eggs, but I follow many of the raw vegan principles on a daily basis.

The wisest way to be vegetarian is to follow the advice for any healthy diet: stick to whole foods, or something that you can recognize as a product of nature. Base your diet around vegetables, not grains and breads. In fact, the more you can limit them, the better. Your health will improve, and you will fill the void with more vegetables, healthy fats, and organic protein sources.

This is merely the tip of the iceberg on how to live a healthy, vegetarian lifestyle. If you have more specific concerns, I’m happy to take your questions and do some follow-up posts if needed.

Eat your vegetables,
Emily

Kale Chips (Video)

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Kale is one of my favorite vegetables. It is densely nutritious and surprisingly versatile. While I normally sauté kale, you can also bake it in the oven with a few simple ingredients to make a delicious snack food. These Kale Chips are considerably more nutritious than regular chips and still taste fantastic. Kale is also fairly inexpensive, and this recipe is quite easy.

While I don’t agree with every aspect of his philosophy, I am still a big fan of Mark Sisson’s blog, Mark’s Daily Apple. Mark held a contest in which readers were asked to make a video of a recipe that fits into the “Primal Blueprint” (his diet/exercise/lifestyle philosophy). I entered the contest with my recipe of Kale Chips and thought I would share the video with my readers.

Kale Chips
– 1 bunch kale
– 2 TBS extra virgin olive oil
– sea salt
– chili powder

1. Rinse and dry kale thoroughly. Tear into chip-sized pieces and place in bowl, discarding stems.
2. Pour olive oil, sea salt, and chili powder (to taste) over the kale and massage with hands until fully coated.
3. Bake in a 275F degree* oven. After 10 minutes, shift kale slightly, and bake until crisp (about another five minutes).

*In the video, I say to use a 200F degree oven. However, I found out after filming this that my old (and squeaky!) oven was very inaccurate. An oven thermometer informed me that my oven was actually heating much higher than I was setting it. 275 degrees should work.

Let me know if you enjoy video recipe posts and you may see more in the future!

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Thanks for reading (and watching),
Emily

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